tongue-twister:

The most beautiful thing I’ve read today by far.

(Source: kanyewestcoast, via voodoowitchpriestessprincess)

yagazieemezi:

ART FEATURE

AFRICAN ARTIST:

Ralph Ziman

Ziman, a South African street artist who now resides in Venice Beach, California, attacks Africa’s dominant gun culture with piercing colors and images that don’t fade from memory. With knitted masks and beaded weapons, Ziman paints Africa’s obsession with guns and the power they provide as so bizarre and overwhelming it’s nearly surreal. Both worshipped and feared, Ziman’s guns appear like dangerous totems from an unknown ritual, somewhat removed from the gun culture we’ve heard so much about. The vendors who star in Ziman’s photos were not at all directed in how to pose with the weapon replicas. Yet the viewer can sense the additional status pulsing through the subjects as they hold their powerful instruments, even if only for the duration of a photograph.

(via ausetkmt)

phiife:

dopematters:

Black Queen Work by Sara Golish


Glory

phiife:

dopematters:

Black Queen
Work by Sara Golish

Glory

(via terrasmiles)

humansofnewyork:

"I do social work, focusing on young families. Basically I play and dance with babies."

humansofnewyork:

"I do social work, focusing on young families. Basically I play and dance with babies."

(via terrasmiles)

alexandraelle:

drosenthalart:

Start them babies off young! The earlier they tap into their creativity the better!!!

Love.

(Source: lorrynetta, via terrasmiles)

yagazieemezi:

Work by Lawrence Agyei

View more

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

That’s Dominique in the middle I think.

Man. So so sad.

(via terrasmiles)

spiritual-realm:

❀❈

badbilliejean:

nappynisha:

Monday was one of the best days that I’ve had in a while.

Fro Envy.

(via blackgirlsbirthedtheearth)

theeverimaginable:

radtasticly-anomalous:

sirdexrjones:

You often feature Black people in a positive, stylish and sometimes provocative light. Is there a specific reason for this?

"I don’t know when it all started, but for a years, I’ve been very color-conscious. I’ve been very race-conscious, and I’m very aware that I’m not just an artist, but a black artist. And I have no problem with that. I’m very careful about how we are portrayed. I know that if you google the word ‘beauty’ right now, 99.9 percent of the faces that come up will be a white woman’s face, and that’s a bit astonishing. And, I don’t know, I just feel like images speak volumes, and when I speak to people through my images, I just want to make sure I’m saying something positive when it comes to the issue of Black women or Black men.

I also tell negative stories, I can show an ugly side or tell an ugly truth, but at the end of it all I want the message to be something beautiful and positive that not just Black people can relate to but everyone can relate to, and I want everyone to understand it. But that’s not always going to happen. Not everyone is going to look at my work and see beautiful, stylized, somewhat provocative photos. I guess some people will just see ‘ugly naked bodies’ or ‘pornographic images’; ‘uncombed afros’ or long ‘unkempt dreadlocks’. But that’s kind of why the image is out there, to expose people to those images more, and desensitize them to it.  Black power is still scary to a lot of people.  It shouldn’t be something to be afraid of.  Black Power is a necessity.”

- Dexter Ryan Jones (artist/photographer)
IG: sirdexrjones

yes!

Love this. It’s so fabulous.

(via sirrealphoto)

thatnigeriankid:

 

(Source: carangi, via naturee-feels)

gotraveling:

Trees near Boti Falls, Ghana ~ by Laurel Chor

gotraveling:

Trees near Boti Falls, Ghana ~ by Laurel Chor

(via ladyfresh)